Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

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During this trip to Osaka, we made a day stop at Hiroshima to visit the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome. It was a solemn experience and really a good lesson and visit for the usual (iPad-carrying) children.

Using our JR Rail Pass Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass

We got a JR Rail Pass called Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass to get us around from Osaka to Hiroshima and then to Miyajima Island (and to see the Itsukushima Shrine). Later on our way back, we stopped over at Kobe (where we visited the Arima-Onsen). So it was our “ticket” to the areas to the left of Osaka.

As it was a five day pass so we used up 3 days in the above routes and have 2 more days to use in Osaka. We used it for Universal Studio and a visit to Nissan Noodles Museum. That was how we used our pass.

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

I am sure it is even more useful if we had stopped over at places such as Himeji and Okayama.

Also the pass can be used for West JR Bus and Chugoku JR Bus (which we used for the Hiroshima sightseeing loop bus which will be covered below) as well as the JR-West Miyajima Ferry (which we took to Miyajima Island) !

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

FYI that we activated the JR Pass at the Shin Osaka Shinkansen station. Very easy and you can activate “ahead of time”. I remembered I activated it two days from the first train ride (ie. the ride to Hiroshima). The clock starts from the day you started your first ride on the JR Pass.

You will get two tickets. One for the JR Pass and one for the specific route you are taking (and has booked). For example for my trip from Shin-Osaka to Hiroshima, everyone of us has two tickets. One for the 5 days JR Pass and one for the Shinkansen train from Osaka to Hiroshima. You just need put both tickets into the gate. The gate can handle that.

These are my JR Passes for Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass. You need keep these carefully for the whole period of time.

JR Passes for Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass
JR Passes for Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass

These are my Reserved Seating Tickets for Nozomi from Shin-Osaka to Hiroshima.

Reserved Seating Tickets for Nozomi from Shin-Osaka to Hiroshima
Reserved Seating Tickets for Nozomi from Shin-Osaka to Hiroshima

Getting to Hiroshima from Shin-Osaka

Of course, the point of getting the JR Rail Pass Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass is that you can take the Shinkansen trains. You can even take the fastest train, the Nozomi.

By using the pass, you can take a bullet train on the Sanyo Shinkansen Line from Shin-Osaka Station to Hiroshima Station. Journey times vary according to the model of the train. The faster models like the Mizuho and the Nozomi take just 1 hour and 25 minutes.

That’s what we took fro Shin-Osaka station (where we are staying at the two hotels nearby, the Holiday Inn Shin Osaka and the Marriott Courtyard at Shin Osaka).

Getting to Hiroshima from Shin-Osaka
Getting to Hiroshima from Shin-Osaka

The train to bring us to Hiroshima

the train to hiroshima
the train to hiroshima

And we arrived at Hiroshima super fast.. too fast 🙁

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

Hello Hiroshima Station

hiroshima station
hiroshima station

Getting from Hiroshima Station to Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

To get from the Hiroshima Shinkansen station to the site of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome, you should use the Chugoku JR Bus (Sightseeing Loop bus) called Hiroshima Meipuru-pu. You can read about it also on this JR link.

And in researching for this blog post, I found a map which I did not have during my trip preparation. The map is here at this link. It offers the route map to how to use the Hiroshima Meipuru-pu system to visit many Hiroshima sights, including the Hiroshima Peace Memorial etc.

You can pretty much take any route but I took the ORANGE ROUTE from Shinkansen station to the Atomic Bomb Dome.

Hiroshima sightseeing loop bus Hiroshima Meipuru-pu
Hiroshima sightseeing loop bus Hiroshima Meipuru-pu

I mentioned about this loop bus back in my blog post on staying at the Nest Hotel Hiroshima. It offers a way to get from the Shinkansen train station to my hotel too.

And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL, the cost of these rides are UNLIMITED and FREE with the JR Rail Pass Kansai-Hiroshima Area Pass !

Getting from Hiroshima Station to Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

There is a fare to use the bus but it does NOT apply to you, if you have the JR Rail Pass.

Getting from Hiroshima Station to Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

The route on Orange Route takes us to the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome.

Getting from Hiroshima Station to Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

And we will stop at bus stop 6 !

Getting from Hiroshima Station to Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

The Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome, also known as the Hiroshima Peace Memorial or Genbaku Dome. It is an iconic structure located in Hiroshima, Japan. The dome was originally a building known as the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, designed by a Czech architect named Jan Letzel and completed in 1915.

On August 6, 1945, during World War II, the city of Hiroshima was devastated by an atomic bomb, known as “Little Boy,” which was dropped by the United States. The blast and subsequent fires destroyed most of the city, but the Atomic Bomb Dome, located near the hypocenter, managed to remain standing despite being heavily damaged.

After the war, there were debates on whether to demolish the dome or preserve it as a memorial. Eventually, it was decided to preserve the dome in its ruined state as a reminder of the catastrophic effects of the atomic bomb and as a symbol of peace. In 1996, it was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Today, the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome stands as a poignant memorial and a powerful symbol of the devastating consequences of nuclear warfare. It serves as a reminder of the importance of peace, nuclear disarmament, and the pursuit of a world free from nuclear weapons.

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome with Signboard
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
looking into Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
looking into Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
it can be very thoughtful when you are here
it can be very thoughtful when you are here
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

Take a walk AROUND the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome but then you can carry on to the Hiroshima Memorial Park too.

Hiroshima Memorial Park

You might be tempted to think that there is all in the park. That’s not true. The Atomic Bomb Dome is a key highlight (and the first thing you see when you reached it by Orange Route) but there are many other exhibitions in the Hiroshima Memorial Park.

Hiroshima Memorial Park
Hiroshima Memorial Park

You can reach Hiroshima Memorial Park by crossing over a bridge after you visited the Atomic Bomb Dome. It is a very peaceful short walk. Somehow, your heart will find with solemn feelings and thoughts as you walk across the bridge and you can see the Flame Of Peace etc.

The Motoyasu Bridge

Motoyasu Bridge is an important landmark in Hiroshima, closely associated with the atomic bombing that occurred on August 6, 1945. The bridge, located near the hypocenter of the blast, was severely damaged but managed to remain standing.

Before the bombing, Motoyasu Bridge served as a significant transportation route, connecting various parts of the city. It was a bustling hub of activity and a familiar sight to the people of Hiroshima.

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome

As can be seen from the photo above, the Hiroshima Memorial Park is a significant place of remembrance and peace.

Here are some of the main exhibits and attractions within the park:

  1. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum: This museum offers a comprehensive account of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and its aftermath. It displays artifacts, photographs, personal belongings, and testimonies that provide a detailed insight into the tragic events of August 6, 1945. The museum also highlights the ongoing efforts for nuclear disarmament and promoting peace worldwide.
  2. Peace Memorial Park: The park itself is a tranquil and beautiful space designed to commemorate the victims of the atomic bombing. It features numerous memorials, monuments, and sculptures dedicated to promoting peace and understanding. The park’s centerpiece is the Atomic Bomb Dome, which serves as a powerful symbol of the destructive power of nuclear weapons.
  3. Children’s Peace Monument: This monument was built in memory of Sadako Sasaki, a young girl who developed leukemia due to radiation exposure from the atomic bombing. The monument features a statue of Sadako holding a paper crane, symbolizing her desire for peace and the global movement inspired by her story to fold 1,000 origami cranes for peace.
  4. Peace Bell: A large bronze bell located in the park, the Peace Bell is rung by visitors as a gesture of prayer and reflection for peace. Its inscription reads, “Let all nuclear arms and wars be gone, and the nations live in true peace!,” conveying the desire for a world free of nuclear weapons.
  5. Cenotaph for the A-bomb Victims: This arched monument holds a stone chest containing the names of all the known victims of the atomic bombing. It serves as a memorial for those who lost their lives and as a solemn reminder of the human toll of the bombing.

Together, they create a powerful and emotional experience that encourages visitors to reflect on the consequences of war and the importance of working towards a peaceful world.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum is a poignant and informative museum located within the Hiroshima Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan. It offers a comprehensive and deeply moving account of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, and its aftermath.

Through powerful exhibits, including artifacts, photographs, personal belongings, and survivor testimonies, the museum provides visitors with a profound understanding of the devastating impact of nuclear warfare on the city and its people. It also sheds light on the ongoing efforts for nuclear disarmament and the promotion of peace worldwide. The museum serves as a crucial educational resource, inspiring visitors to reflect on the horrors of war and to strive for a peaceful and nuclear-free world.

Do plan to spend couple of hours at this museum. You will NOT be disappointed. It is a VERY VERY TOUCHING museum.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum/image
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

These exhibits are things left behind after the bomb dropped on Hiroshima.

exhibits of post atomic bomb in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
exhibits of post atomic bomb in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
exhibits of post atomic bomb in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum
exhibits of post atomic bomb in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

The “tricycle and metal helmet” exhibit

The “tricycle and metal helmet” exhibit in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum is a display that highlights the devastating impact of the atomic bombing on children. It features a tricycle and a metal helmet that belonged to a young boy named Shinichi Tetsutani, who was only four years old when the bomb was dropped.

The "tricycle and metal helmet" exhibit
tricycle and metal helmet
The "tricycle and metal helmet" exhibit
The “tricycle and metal helmet” exhibit

The “Lunch Box and Water Bottle” exhibit

In the somber depths of Hiroshima’s tragic past, Shigeru Orimen, a first-year student at second Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School, vanished forever on that fateful day of August 6, 1945. His home awaited his return, unaware of the cruel twist of fate that awaited them. Three agonizing days passed before his grieving mother discovered a lifeless body, clutching a lunch box tightly against its stomach. And there, frozen in time, rests the uneaten meal, preserved for 72 years, burnt and blackened by the searing flames of destruction. A haunting relic, echoing the sorrow and shattered hopes of a young life extinguished too soon.

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome
Hiroshima

What is the difference between Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome and the Hiroshima Memorial Park

As you can see, the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome and the Hiroshima Memorial Park are distinct but interconnected sites.

The Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome is the first building you see when you arrived via Orange Route on the Hiroshima Meipuru-pu system. It is a very famous (or infamous) specific building that survived the atomic bombing on August 6, 1945. It was once the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, designed by Jan Letzel. Despite being heavily damaged, the dome structure managed to remain standing near the hypocenter of the bomb blast.

Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome stands tall
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome stands tall

On the other hand, the Hiroshima Memorial Park encompasses a larger area surrounding the Atomic Bomb Dome. It is a public park established as a memorial to the victims of the atomic bombing. The park serves as a place of remembrance, reflection, and education about the devastating impact of nuclear warfare. It features various monuments, memorials, sculptures, and exhibits dedicated to promoting peace and understanding.

The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, located within the park, is a significant exhibit that provides detailed information about the atomic bombing and its aftermath. It offers historical context, displays artifacts, photographs, and testimonies to educate visitors about the tragedy and its lasting effects.

Hiroshima Memorial Park
Hiroshima Memorial Park

There are other museums such as Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims which I did not have time to visit.

Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims
Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims

Conclusion : Visit or Not. No need ask.

Yes. Please do find time to visit the Hiroshima Memorial Park and the Atomic Bomb Dome. Bring your children. Share with them the history of World War II and how war is such a dreadful thing that we should avoid at all cost.

This photo taken of my son learning about war made this trip all worthwhile.

my son learning about war
my son learning about war

The horrors of atomic war. We don’t want that ever in our lifetime.

The horrors of atomic war. We don't want that ever in our lifetime.
The horrors of atomic war. We don’t want that ever in our lifetime.

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